Two ways to the Korean reunification

Mostly unnoticed by the South-Koreans and entirely unnoticed by the North-Koreans, I am now leaving this beautiful country after seven years.

Today I said goodbye to the most nourishing people of the daily life – the ever smiling kimbab-masters and the seller-ladies in the supermarket where I would reinvest great parts of my salary in broccoli, sprouts, parsley and salad leaves. When they say “you are leaving for good, so you won’t come back?”, it sounds rather happy and relieved. In European style, you have to pretend sadness, in Korea there is a tradition of self-reliance: foreigners are welcome and especially welcome when they leave again. This is a rather sane anti-globalist attitude.

 

On the way to the airport, I started to re-read Barbara Demick’s “Nothing to envy. Ordinary lives in North Korea”. In 2012, this was a shocker. Demick (USA) is a great writer and award winner, which means she is perfect in depicting the horrors of the Northern dictatorship and blind to the abysses and lies of her own system (“US-led U.N. fought the Communists”). Many truthers deduce from the propaganda against the “axis of evil” countries that it is likely to be not so bad in reality. There is no logic in this expectation. You have to question and investigate each single system on its own without relativism. Demick’s book is still very powerful in its truth and depth. She tells the interwoven stories of people from the North who defected to the South. After all, it is not about the regimes, but about bravery and heroical characters.

 

If there will be a reunification, which apparently is in nobody’s interest except for Koreans with patriotic feelings, it will be an uneven but fruitful exchange. Seen by the Southerners as backwarded, traumatised and brainwashed, the Northerners could teach them lessons of how to survive in extreme conditions, how to serve the country and hold together the family, how to eat weed and grass and survive without junk food, how to bear unbearable contradictions.

 

It is utopian but would be the best gift, if the power elite of the North released its people by making them all truthers, by providing them information about the true background of globalization. Then they would not have to feel backwarded but luckily not-brainwashed by the Western system which is much harder to understand and accept. There is the similar hope in Europe in the Muslim and African new settlers: given their stress of being outsiders, many of them could turn into dissidents of the system and thus join the real patriots. For now, there is no such sign neither in Germany nor in Korea on a massive scale. So the reunification would be too early now. Certainly unaware of these noble possibilities, the leaders of both states seem to act as cautiously as possible to keep progress under the radar of the neighbors and “friends”. Especially China cannot be interested in a Greater Korea under US control. Maybe the game is to push the Korean dream forward and then blame China for disrupting such a wonderful peace process, in order to have an excuse to attack it. Time is not on the side of the empire. A wounded tiger is dangerous.

 

A second option in favor of a reunification would be the same back-up effect the consumerist enthusiasm had for Germany in 1989. When the South Koreans will get increasingly sick of their materialistic and consumerist system, 25 millions enthusiasts from the North will rescue it by discovering the paradise in trade and consumption. This would be another re-set of capitalism as occurred often in the past. The Communist block was created by the Wallstreet “elite”, in order to always have at hand hungry masses to rejuvenate the West. Antony Sutton proved this Wallstreet thesis in the 1980s. With the Internet and all the manual dumbing down devices, it is now easier than ever to get “savages” hooked on the system.

The South Koreans don’t suffer from the German servility towards leaders who push them towards auto-genocide (the former President is still in jail, unlike her German counterpart), but – with the author of the “Brave New World”, Aldous Huxley, they also love their servitude to the system. So the false flag strategy with China is more likely to take place in the near future. Another question is whether the war will be a hot or a hybrid war. This depends on the real interdependency and the role of China in the NWO plans. Stock and currency markets will tell before media will.

71o11spqxyl

 

 

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